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APA Style Guide, 7th ed.

This guide provides tips and examples for APA style formatting of papers and citations.

Artwork and Maps

Artwork in a Book

APA Style is all about leading your reader to the source you used, not an image in a source. For this reason, you simply cite the book (you can include a page number) when citing artwork you've found within its pages.

Examples

Elsen, A.E. (2003). Rodin’s art: The Rodin collection of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University (p. 176). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Apollinaire, G., Podoksik, A., & Eimert, D. (2010). Cubism. New York, NY: Parkstone International.


Artwork in a Database

If the artwork you are referencing was viewed from a private database (e.g. a library database like Artstor), it is not necessary to include the database in the citation or the password protected URL. You can include the URL of the publisher, but you may need to do a quick web search to locate it. This is reflected in​ both examples below. (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, pp. 191-192).

Examples

Douglas, A. (1936). Aspirations [Painting]. https://www.famsf.org/

O'Keefe, G. (1935). Sunflower, New Mexico, I [Painting]. http://www.clevelandart.org/


Artwork on a Website (including photography, paintings, sculpture, etc.)

The goal of your reference is to contain enough information to lead your reader to the source you used in the most concise manner possible. At minimum, artwork references should include the artist's name, year(s) of fabrication, title of the work, any other necessary or relevant information (such as the medium), and the location.

Examples

Smith, S. (2016, July 21). Sunflower field [Photograph]. Provence, France. https://flic.kr/p/KiWbWS

Goya y Lucientes, F. (1800). The family of Carlos IV [Painting]. Madrid, Spain: Museo Nacional del Prado. www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/the-family-of-carlos-iv/f47898fc-aa1c-48f6-a779-71759e417e74

Klee, P. (1922). Twittering machine [Painting]. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art. www.artchive.com/artchive/K/klee/twittering_machine.jpg.html


Artwork Experienced In-Person

If you experience a piece of artwork on display at a museum or gallery, the goal of your reference is to contain enough information to lead your reader to the original source. At minimum, artwork references should include the artist's name, year(s) of fabrication, title of the work, any other necessary or relevant information (such as the medium), and the location.

Examples

Wyeth, A. (1948). Christina’s world [Painting]. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art.

Rodin, A. (1902). The thinker [Bronze and marble sculpture]. Paris, France: Musée Rodin.


Map

If it is a stand-alone map, such as a topographical map printed by the US Geological Survey, include a document description in brackets.

Examples

US Geological Survey. (1994). Alameda Well, CA [Map].

US Geological Survey. (1973). Dunnigan, CA [Map].


Map in a Book

APA Style is all about leading your reader to the source you used - not an image of a map in a source. For this reason, you simply cite the book when citing maps you've found within its pages. You can cite it as a reference work with no byline as reflected in the second example below.

Examples

Magocsi, P R. Historical atlas of Central Europe (revised ed., p. 191). Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.

Northwestern South America. (2015). In Atlas of the world (10th ed., p. 52). Washington, D.C: National Geographic Society.

McCoy, R.M. (2012). Expeditions in the Arctic islands. In On the Edge: Mapping North America's Coasts (p. 175). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.


Map on a Website

When citing a dynamically created map such as Google Maps, describe the map in square brackets [ ] and include the date retrieved.

Examples:

US Geological Survey. (2015). Bruceville quadrangle [Map]. Retrieved from http://prd-tnm.s3.amazonaws.com/StagedProducts/Maps/USTopo/1/22249/7534222.pdf

California Department of Parks and Recreation. (2017, July 1). California state parks system [Map]. Retrieved from https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=862